This Months Sky

News on what is visable in this months sky as posted by Adrian Zielonka's in his monthly sky notes.

Thank you Adrian and thank you CADAS.

Astronomy
News

Night Sky 2019 - August

Sunrise

Sunset

Mercury Rises

Venus

1st
5:36am

10th
5:49am

20th
6:05am

30th
– 6:21am

1st
8:58pm

10th
8:42pm

20th
8:23pm

30th
– 8:02pm

5th
4:23am

10th
4:14am

15th
4:21am

20th
4:43am

25th
– 5:14am

Is
at inferior conjunction on the 14th and is not visible this month.

Moon Rise

Moon Set

Moon Rise

Moon Set

1st -
5:39am

2nd
7:02am (ENE)

3rd
8:27am

4th
9:51am

5th
11:13am (E)

6th
12:32pm

7th
1:50pm

8th
3:05pm (ESE)

9th
4:16pm

10th
5:23pm

11th
6:22pm

12th
7:13pm

13th
7:54pm

14th
8:28pm

15th
8:56pm

16th
9:19pm (ESE)

17th
9:39pm

18th
9:58pm

19th
10:16pm (E)

1st
9:33pm

2nd
10:06pm (WNW)

3rd
10:33pm

4th
10:57pm (W)

5th
11:20pm

6th
11:43pm

8th
12:07am (WSW)

9th
12:35am

10th
1:07am

11th
1:46am

12th
2:33am

13th
3:27am

14th
4:27am

15th
5:30am

16th
6:35am (WSW)

17th
7:41am

18th
8:46am

19th
9:51am (W)

20th
10:57am

20th
10:34pm

21st
10:54pm

22nd
11:16pm (ENE)

23rd
11:44pm

25th
12:18am

26th
1:03am

27th
2:00am

28th
3:10am

29th
4:30am

30th
5:55am (ENE)

31st
– 7:21am

-
- - - - - -

Moon Phases

New Moon – 1st

First Quarter –7th

Full Moon – 15th

Last Quarter – 23rd

New
Moon – 30th

21st
12:03pm

22nd
1:11pm (WNW)

23rd
2:21pm

24th
3:31pm

25th
4:40pm

26th
5:44pm

27th
6:39pm

28th
7:24pm

29th
8:01pm (WNW)

30th
8:31pm 287

31st
– 8:57pm

-
- - - - - -


All times in notes

are set for

Somerton,

unless stated.


A
useful site: www.heavens-above.com

A
S Zielonka

There is a
possible launch this month* of a Boeing Commercial Crew Pad Abort
Test. Its to prepare the CST-100 Starliner spacecraft for crew
transportation to the International Space Station (ISS). Boeing will
test the systems' launch capability on the pad and during ascent.
(See 'News' section below)

Comet C/2018 W2 Africano is in the constellation of Camelopardalis
this month. Its at perihelion in September.

Comet C/2018 R3 Lemmon is in the constellation of Lynx at the
beginning of the month. (For further information on either of these,
please see 'Comet' section in the website above).

At 9:30pm on the 2nd a very thin crescent Moon is 4½
degrees above the horizon in the WNW (285 azimuth) with Regulus in
Leo 5 degrees to the lower right of the Moon and just 1 degree above
the horizon.

On the 3rd at 9:30pm in the west the star Denebola (2.1
mag) in Leo is 9 degrees directly above the thin crescent Moon.

In
the west on 3
rd
at 10:00pm the Comet 123P West Hartley is 1¾ degrees above the star
Porrima (2 .7 mag) in Virgo. It was at perihelion on Feb 5
th.
It is currently 2.880AU from us and at a very low magnitude. Unlikely
to be seen with a small powered telescope.

The
South Iota Aquariids meteor shower reaches its peak on the 4
th.

At 10:00pm on the 4th the star Porrima (2.7 mag) in Virgo
is 6 degrees to the left of the crescent Moon.

On the 5th at 10:00pm the star Spica (1.0 mag) in Virgo is
8 degrees to the lower left of the crescent Moon.

At 10:00pm on the 7th the Moon is between the two stars
Zubeneschamali (2.6 mag) and Zubenelgenubi (2.7 mag) – both in
Libra.

The asteroid Ceres is 3½ degrees below left of the Moon at 11:00pm
on the 8th. (For further information please see 'Asteroid'
section in the website above).

On the 8th at midnight the star Acrab (2.5 mag) in
Scorpius is 3 degrees to the lower left of the Moon which is low in
the south west.

At midnight on the 9th Jupiter is just 1¾ degrees to the
lower left of the Moon in the south west.

On the 10th at midnight Jupiter is 12 degrees to the lower
right of the Moon.

Mercury is at maximum western elongation on the 10th. On
the 11th at 5:00am Castor and Pollux in the ENE point the
way to Mercury. Mercury is 7½ degrees above the horizon and at 68.5
degrees azimuth.

At midnight on the 11th Saturn is 6 degrees to the upper
left of the Moon. The star Omicron Sagittarii (3.7 mag) is just half
a degree above Saturn between the 10th - 15th
and by the 30th they will be 1 degree apart.

An
occultation of Saturn by the Moon occurs on the 12
th.
This is only visible from Australia, North New Zealand and many of
the islands north of these countries.

An
occultation of Pluto occurs also on the 12
th.
This will be visible from central Africa and the north half of South
America.

On the 12th at midnight Saturn is 6½ degrees to the right
of the Moon low in the south.

The Perseids meteor
shower reaches its peak on the 12th / 13th.

At midnight on the 14th the star Iota Capricorni (4.2 mag)
is just 2¾ degrees to the upper left of the Moon.

On the 15th at 9:30pm the star Delta Capricorni (2.8 mag) is 3½
degrees to the upper right of the Moon.

At 10:15pm on the 16th the star Tau Aquarii (4.0 mag) is 1
degree below the Moon.

On the 16th at 11:00pm the asteroid Ceres is just 1¼
degrees above the star Dschubba (2.2 mag) in Scorpius. (For further
information please see 'Asteroid' section in the website above).

The Beehive Cluster (M44) is just 1 degree to the upper right of
Mercury on the 17th. At 5:00am Mercury's position is 4
degrees above the horizon and at 65 degrees azimuth (ENE).

On the 17th at midnight Neptune is 5¾ degrees to the
upper right of the Moon. Neptune is ¾ of a degree to the left of the
star Phi Aquarii (4.2 mag).

The
Kappa Cygnids meteor shower reaches its peak on the 18th.

At 11:00pm on the 18th the star Iota Ceti (3.5 mag) in
Cetus is 4½ degrees to the lower right of the Moon.

Mercury is at perihelion (its nearest to the Sun in its orbit) on the
20th.

On the 20th at midnight the star Nu Piscium (4.4 mag) in
Pisces is 2¼ degrees above right of the Moon. Uranus is 10½ degrees
to the left of the Moon.

In the east at midnight on the 21st Uranus is 6 degrees
above the Moon. The Moon is also midway (2 degrees from both) between
Mu Ceti (4.2 mag) and Xi Ceti (4.3 mag) in Cetus.

On the 22nd at midnight the asteroid Vesta is 3½ degrees
to the lower left of the Moon. (For further information please see
'Asteroid' section in the website above).

Between 3:00 – 5:00am on the 24th the Moon will occult
the star Delta Tauri (3.7 mag) in Taurus and other less brighter
stars in close proximity.

At 5:00am on the 25th the star Zeta Tauri (2.9 mag) in
Taurus is 4 degrees to the lower left of the crescent Moon.

On the 26th at 5:00am the star Mu Geminorum (2.8 mag) in
Gemini is just 1¼ degrees to the left of the crescent Moon.

Mars is at aphelion ( Its most distant from the Sun in its orbit) on
the 26th.

Between 4:30 – 5:00am on the 27th the Moon passes very
close to the star Wasat in Gemini. It will pass within a ¼ of a
degree to the upper left of the crescent Moon.

On the 30th at 1:00pm the Moon, Mercury, Venus and Mars
are all within 5 degrees of the Sun.

At 8:30pm on the 31st low in the west (273 degrees
azimuth) a very thin crescent Moon will be just 3 degrees above the
horizon.

At the end of the month Neptune will be just ½ a degree left of the
star Phi Aquarii (4.2 mag) in Aquarius.

* = Dates and times
are subject to change.

Facts:
The Sun is 400 times larger than the Moon but is 400 times further
away from Earth, making them appear the same size & only half a
billionth of the energy released by the Sun reaches Earth.

News: NASA and
Boeing completed two different tests of the CST-100 Starliner
parachute system in June at two different locations in the desert of
the western United States. The tests were part of a series of
parachute tests providing valuable data needed to prove the system is
safe to carry astronauts to and from the ISS as part of NASA's
commercial Crew Program.

The first test,
conducted on June 24th at the U.S. Army’s White Sands
Missile Range in New Mexico, used a full-scale Starliner test
article, known as a boiler plate, designed to simulate the actual
spacecraft. This test featured a double failure scenario meaning one
of the parachute system’s two drogue parachutes and one of the
three main parachutes were both intentionally disabled to test how
the remaining parachutes handled the additional loads during
deployment and descent. The next test occurred on
June 26th using a dart-shaped test device meant to
function as a Starliner weight simulant. The device was released from
a C-17 aircraft above the U.S. Army’s Yuma Proving Ground in
Arizona. This was a “high Q” test, meaning the parachutes were
intentionally inflated at higher pressures than they are expected to
see during missions.

Astronomy
News

Night Sky 2019 - July

Sunrise

Sunset

Mercury Sets

Venus Rises

1st – 5:00am

10th – 5:08am

20th – 5:19am

30th – 5:33am

1st – 9:29pm

10th – 9:24pm

20th – 9:15pm

30th – 9:01pm

1st – 10:29pm

4th – 10:15pm

7th – 9:59pm

1st – 4:13am

10th – 4:24am

20th – 4:44am

30th – 5:10am

Moon Rise

Moon Set

Moon Rise

Moon Set

1st – 3:53am

2nd – 4:39am

3rd – 5:37am

4th – 6:47am

5th – 8:05am

6th - 9:27am (ENE)

7th – 10:49am

8th – 12:09pm

9th – 1:28pm (E)

10th – 2:45pm

11th – 4:00pm (ESE)

12th – 5:14pm

13th – 6:24pm

14th – 7:29pm

15th – 8:27pm

16th – 9:15pm

17th – 9:54pm

18th – 10:26pm

1st – 8:12pm

2nd – 9:18pm

3rd – 10:15pm

4th – 11:01pm

5th – 11:37pm (WNW)

7th – 12:06am

8th – 12:31am

9th – 12:54am (W)

10th – 1:15am

11th – 1:38am

12th – 2:03am (WSW)

13th – 2:32am

14th – 3:06am

15th – 3:48am

16th – 4:37am

17th – 5:34am

18th – 6:35am

19th – 7:40am

19th – 10:52pm (ESE)

20th – 11:14pm

21st – 11:34pm

22nd – 11:52pm (E)

24th – 12:10am

25th – 12:29am (ENE)

26th – 12:51am

27th – 1:16am

28th – 1:47am

29th – 2:26am

30th – 3:18am

31st – 4:23am

- - - - - - -

New Moon – 2nd

First Quarter –9th

Full Moon – 16th

Last Quarter – 25th

20th – 8:45am (WSW)

21st – 9:51am

22nd – 10:56am

23rd – 12:01pm (W)

24th – 1:08pm

25th – 2:16pm (WNW)

26th – 3:26pm

27th – 4:37pm

28th – 5:50pm

29th – 6:59pm

30th – 8:00pm

31st – 8:51pm

- - - - - - -

All times in notes

are set for

Somerton,

unless stated.

A useful site:
www.heavens-above.com

A S Zielonka

The best time to view Comet C/2018R3 Lemmon will be around midnight in the first two weeks of July. Around this time it will approximately be 15 degrees above the north horizon. It was at perihelion on June
7th. It was at 10.5 magnitude on the 11th June. (for further information please see the 'Comet' section in the website above)

There is a launch sometime this month of a Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral, Florida. An uncrewed SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft will deliver supplies and equipment to the International Space Station
(ISS).

Comet C/2018 W2 Africano this month is in the constellation of Camelopardalis which is to the left of the “W” of Cassiopeia. It is currently to faint to be seen with low powered telscopes. On the 1st
its 2.299AU from us and on the 31st its 1.749AU. It reaches perihelion on the September 5th. (For further information please see the 'Comet' section in the website above)

From the 1st - 6th at 10:00pm low in the WNW Mercury is 3¾ degrees from the left to the lower left of Mars. On the 4th at 10:00pm the thin crescent Moon is in the WNW. Mercury
is 7 degrees to the lower right of the Moon and 2 degrees above the horizon at 295 degrees azimuth. Mars is 4 degrees above right of Mercury and 4 degrees above the horizon at 299 degrees azimuth. The Beehive Cluster (M45) in Cancer is 3 degrees to the lower
right of the Moon towards Mars. There is also an occultation of the planet Mars by the Moon on the 4th. This will be only be visible from southern Asia.

On the 1st at 4:30am and low in the north east, a very thin crescent Moon will be 4 degrees above the horizon at 64 degrees azimuth with Venus 10 degrees to the left of the Moon and just 2 degrees
above the horizon.

On the 2nd* a full-stress test of the Orion spacecraft's Launch Abort System will launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. This is a critical milestone for human missions to the Moon
as this test will show that it can carry a crew to safety in case of an emergency during launch.

There is a Total Eclipse of the Sun on the 2nd. Totality occurs over Chile and Argentina and the partial phases cover almost all of South America and the South Pacific.

At 10:00pm on the 3rd low in the WNW a very thin crescent Moon will be 1 degree above the horizon 303 degrees azimuth. Mars is 5½ degrees to the upper left of the Moon and 4 degrees above the horizon.
Mercury is 4 degrees to the lower left of Mars and 3 degrees above the horizon at 295 degrees azimuth.

At 10:00pm on the 4th Regulus (1.3 mag) is 5 degrees to the left of the crescent Moon. The star Eta Leonis is 3½ degrees above left of the Moon.

On the 8th at midnight in the west, the star Porrima (2.7 mag) in Virgo is just 1½ degrees to the lower left of the Moon.

Mercury reaches aphelion (its most distant from the Sun in its orbit) on the 7th.

Saturn is at opposition on the 9th.

At midnight on the 9th the star Zeta Virginis (3.3 mag) in Virgo is 4½ degrees to the upper right of the Moon.

On the 11th at midnight the star Zubeneschamali (2.6 mag) in Libra is 5 degrees above right of the Moon.

At midnight on the 12th the star Nu Scorpii (4th mag) in Scorpius is just 1 degree to the lower left of the Moon. Jupiter is also 12 degrees to the left of the Moon.

On the 13th at 10:00pm Jupiter is 1½ degrees to the lower right of the Moon. At midnight they are 2 degrees apart.

Pluto is at opposition on the 14th.

At midnight on the 14th the star Mu Sagittarii (3.8 mag) is 3½ degrees to the upper right of the Moon. Two hours later the Moon will be midway between Saturn (to the left) and Jupiter on the right.
Both 16 degrees apart.

On the 15th at midnight Saturn is 4½ degrees to the left of the Moon. The star Nunki (2nd mag) in Sagittarius is 3 degrees directly below the Moon. The
star Pi Sagittarii in Sagittarius is just 1¼ degrees above Saturn in the SSE.

There is a Partial Lunar Eclipse on the 16th
which is visible from the UK. The Penumbral phase starts at 7:43:53pm then the Partial Phase starts at 9:01:43pm. Mid eclipse is at 10:30:43pm. Partial phase ends at 11:59:39pm then the Penumbral Phase ends at 1:17:36am. The Moon rises at 9:15pm in the ESE
already in the partial phase.

An occultation of Saturn by the Moon occurs on the 16th. This will only be visible from central South America and the equatorial regions of the Pacific Ocean. At midnight on the 16th Saturn
is 8¼ degrees to the right of the Moon.

An occultation of Pluto by the Moon also occurs on the 16th. This occurs over the north western half of Australia, Indonesia and the equatorial region of the Indian Ocean.

On the 19th at 4:00am the star Nashira (3.6 mag) in Capricornus is 2 degrees above the Moon.

There is a scheduled launch on the 20th* at 7:28am from Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan. A Russian Soyuz FG rocket will take the Expedition 60 crew into orbit for a same-day rendezvous with the ISS.
The crew members are: Aleksandr Skvortsov (Russian), Luca Parmitano (Italian) and Andrew Morgan (American). They will spend 6 months in orbit. (See News Extra below)

Mercury is at inferior conjunction on the 21st.

At 4:30am on the 21st Neptune is 5¾ degrees to the upper left of the Moon.

On the 22nd Neptune is 7½ degrees to the upper right of the Moon. The star Iota Ceti (3.5 mag) is 6 degrees to the lower left of the Moon.

At 4:30am on the 25th Uranus is 6¼ degrees to the upper left of the Moon.

On the 26th at 4:30am the star Mu Ceti (4.2 mag) in Cetus is 4 degrees to the right of the Moon.

At 4:30am on the 27th the star Lamda Tauri (3.4 mag) in Taurus is 4 degrees below the crescent Moon.

From the 23rd - 27th the asteroid 2 Pallas (9.7 mag) passes to within a quarter of a degree from the star Muphrid (2.6 mag) in Bootes. At 10:30pm during these dates it is in the WSW. (For
further information please see the 'Asteroids' section in the website above)

On the 28th at 4:30am Aldebaran (0.8 mag) in Taurus is 3 degrees to the right of the crescent Moon.

At 4:30am on the 29th the star Zeta Tauri (2.9 mag) in Taurus is just 1¼ degrees above the crescent Moon.

The South, Delta Aquarids meteor shower reach their peak on the 30th during the early evening.

The Alpha Capricornids meteor shower reach their peak also on the 30th during the early evening.

On the 30th at 4:30am the star Mebsuta (3.0 mag) in Gemini is 3½ degrees to the upper left of the Moon.

At 4:50am on the 31st a very thin crescent Moon will be seen low in the ENE. It will be 2½ degrees above the horizon and 59 degrees azimuth. Mercury is 4 degrees below right of the Moon and barely
½ a degree above the horizon at 62 degrees azimuth.

On the 31st at 4:00am in the south, Neptune is 1¼ degrees to the upper left of the star Phi Aquarii (4.2 mag) in Aquarius.

* = Dates and times are subject to change.

News: It was announced on June 7th that NASA is opening the International Space Station for commercial business
so US industry innovation and ingenuity can accelerate a thriving commercial economy in low-Earth orbit.

It was announced on June 11th that robotically surveying lunar craters in record time and mining resources in space
could help NASA establish a sustained human presence at the Moon – part of the agency's broader Moon to Mars exploration approach.

News Extra:

Aleksandr Aleksandrovich Skvortsov (b.1966) is married to Elena Georgievna and have one daughter Anna Aleksandrovna. This will be his 3rd visit to the International Space Station. He is
also a qualified underwater diving and Powered Paragliding (Paraborne) instructor.

Luca Parmitano (b.1976) is married to Kathy Dillow and has two daughters. This is his 2nd visit to the ISS. He is the youngest astronaut to undertake a long-duration mission, at 36 years
and 8 months old on the launch day of his first mission.

Andrew Richard “Drew” Morgan (b.1976) is married to Stacey and have 4 children. He has experience as an emergency physician and flight surgeon for the Army special operations community. He is a colonel
in the US Army from New Castle, Pennsylvania. This will be his first visit to the ISS.

Facts: NASA astronaut Scott Kelly passed Michael Lopez-Alegria for the longest single spaceflight on October 29th 2015. He landed March 1st 2016 after completing a single mission aboard
the International Space Station of 340 days.

It's 50 years this month since Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin first set foot on the Moon.